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FUNshoot News - Gunsmithing: Reducing Recoil-related Injuries

FUNshoot News - Gunsmithing: Reducing Recoil-related Injuries
By FUNshoot News • Issue #45 • View online
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Reducing Recoil-related Injuries
Shooting and hunting is a very exciting sport to indulge in. Also, a gun is a great thing to have around for self-defense. Plus, we can’t help but appreciate how fun it is to go to the shooting range or an airsoft camp. It can help us relieve built-up stress and make us feel psychically better after a long week at work.
However, the part that is not so fun is recoil. Sure, loud noises may be brought down by a good pair of earmuffs – but what do you do about recoil? Recoil injuries can get out of hand very quickly, often leaving severe traumas that even doctors have difficulties in handling. That being said, in order to reduce these injuries, there are several tips that you may want to consider. Check them out!
  • Get a Good Recoil Pad
In most cases, the recoil pad will help determine how much felt recoil you experience. Sure, aluminum or plastic recoil pads – the ones that generally come with the gun – are among the least expensive options. However, they are more likely to injure you with their recoil.
This is why you might want to go for a soft, padded recoil pad instead, as it can suck up the recoil. Rubber is also a good choice, as it is very efficient at absorbing shock and has vibration isolation properties. Make sure that the length of the pull works well with the size of your recoil pad.
  • Go for Recoil Reducing Stocks
There are various stocks that you can buy that have counterweights, spring systems, or other mechanical additions meant to reduce the recoil. These are not necessary for low recoil levels, as they can get quite expensive – but if the recoil particularly bothers you, you may want to invest in something like this.
For example, you can use it if you have a weapon large enough to use a rifle scope for 500-yard lines – as these guns create a bit of recoil. Moreover, you need to protect your gun accessories. Even if you have a short hunting range, recoil can injure you and your gear – and these recoil-reducing stocks are great for preventing that from happening.
  • Use Reduced Recoil Ammunition
Sometimes, you may have the perfect gun that barely has any recoil and the best tools to dampen the effect of the recoil. However, if the ammo you are using is going at full power, then you may expect a lot of recoil as well. Plus, think about it this way: do you really need to push yourself for no reason with full-power ammunition each time you are at the shooting range?
That being said, every major shotshell manufacturer can provide reduced-recoil options for buckshot, birdshot, and slugs. If you are planning to shoot more than a couple of rounds per session, you might want to consider using low-recoil shells. They can make your experience much more pleasant, particularly when it comes to slugs and buckshot.
  • Go for Wearable Recoil Shields
These work pretty much in the same way as a recoil pad – but what makes them special is that you strap them to your shoulder or chest. Many people find these recoil-reducing tools quite convenient for long-range shooting or longer sessions. There are also those who dislike them because apparently, the shield gets in the way. It prevents them from mounting the gun as quickly as they want it.
Despite this fact, they are quite efficient in preventing a recoil injury from happening – but will also protect you if you already have an existent shoulder injury. This way, you will not add further shock to it, injuring yourself once more.
  • Be Careful with the Trigger
If your gun has a heavy trigger, then it will certainly add to the gun recoil. Instead, if you go for a crisp and relatively light trigger, things will be much easier to set off – therefore, making the whole shooting experience less unpleasant.
That being said, don’t even think about diddling with the gun’s trigger and trying to change it yourself. Not only is it dangerous, but the National Firearms Act may not allow you to make certain types of modifications without authorization.
  • Go for 20 Gauge
If you want to reduce the risk of recoil-related injury, then most people suggest that you use a 20 gauge instead of a 12-gauge option. These types of guns are relatively bigger in comparison to their 12-gauge counterparts – and while it might seem like a smart idea to get a smaller gun for lesser recoil, it is actually the opposite.
If the gun is lightweight, it will not have that much stability. Instead, a heavier gun will be held down by its own weight – therefore, reducing the recoil. A 9lbs gun is slightly more difficult to carry around (if you do not like the weight). Still, it will typically result in less recoil. Plus, it may be heavier, but many hunters say that these guns are very fun to shoot.
  • Wear Equipment
The last and perhaps one of the most efficient ways to reduce injuries caused by recoil is to wear the proper equipment. Goggles and gloves are recommended – but in most cases, the gloves are more than sufficient. Go for some snug, yet thin-fitting leather gloves, as they will reduce the amount of shock your hands receive. Make sure that the gloves aren’t too thick, as this can affect your aim when you are pulling the trigger.
Final Thoughts
Recoil is never fun – but there are some ways in which you can protect yourself. Sometimes, it is all a matter of accessories that you have around you. Other times, you might just need to change the gun or the ammo. Whatever option you choose, these small changes
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